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Transportation of Dangerous Goods
certification
(TDG)

Canadian law requires that any person shipping, handling, or transporting dangerous goods must be trained in accordance with Transport Canada’s standards by means of relevant transportation.

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This course will cover: All aspects of handling and transporting chlorine, All aspects of transporting dangerous goods included in Class 1, All aspects of acceptance procedures for transporting by air, All aspects of handling and transporting propane by vessel.

When do I need training?

Training is needed if the types of products that you intend to handle (ship, transport, and receive) meets the definition for a dangerous good as defined in the Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Act and Regulations. The training must be provided before the employees handle the dangerous goods. Training is not required if the employee is under the direct supervision of a TDG certified employee or when an exemption applies. Handling is defined in the TDG Act as: “handling means loading, unloading, packing or unpacking dangerous goods in a means of containment for the purposes of, in the course of or following transportation and includes storing them in the course of transportation (manutention)” only. Always check the TDG Act and Regulations to ensure compliance.

What type of training should be provided to the employees before they handle dangerous goods for transport?

People who handle, offer for transport, or transport dangerous goods need to be trained according to the requirements found in Part 6 of the TDG Regulations, or operate under the direct supervision and be physically accompanied by a trained person who has a valid training certificate. It is also a requirement that the person who is adequately trained and who will perform duties to which the training relates must have in his or her possession a valid training certificate containing the information specified in Section 6.3 of the TDG Regulations.

What are the key elements of TDG?

The TDG Regulations are a set of rules that prescribe safety standards and shipping requirements for thousands of different dangerous goods. The Regulations also provide a means of communicating the nature and level of hazard and risk associated with these dangerous goods. The key elements of TDG Regulations are:

  • Training
  • Classification
  • Preparation of documents such as shipping papers
  • Using dangerous goods safety marks to communicate hazards that the product may pose to public or environment
  • Selection of appropriate containment (packaging)
  • Emergency response assistance plans (ERAP) if required
  • Reporting incidents

Training is the most important element. Employees must receive training before they handle dangerous goods.

Who must comply with TDG?

Anyone who handles (ships, transports, and receives) dangerous goods by road, rail, air, or water (marine) must comply with the TDG Regulations. Handling is defined in the TDG Act as:

“handling means loading, unloading, packing or unpacking dangerous goods in a means of containment for the purposes of, in the course of or following transportation and includes storing them in the course of transportation (manutention)”

The federal TDG Regulations apply to everyone. The regulations even apply when a member of the public transports dangerous goods such as gasoline, oxygen, and propane for personal use. However, certain exemptions exist for small quantities or for specific situations.

In most cases, there are three main groups of people who handle, offer for transport, or transport dangerous goods who must comply with TDG. These groups are:

  • Consignors – Anyone who ships the dangerous goods such as manufacturers, distributors, or member of the public.
  • Carriers – Anyone who transports the dangerous goods such as trucking companies, air cargo companies, and marine shipping companies.
  • Consignees – Anyone who receives the dangerous goods from a consignor.
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